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12 Questions: Richard Power Hoffman

Richard Power HoffmanHi, I’m Rich Hoffman.

I am an independent filmmaker that does a little bit of everything- write, shoot, direct, edit, produce- on a wide variety of projects.  I grew up in Philadelphia, and returned to the area in 1997 to marry my high school sweetheart and start Coyopa Productions, my client service business.  I’ve done everything from weddings and bar mitzvahs to commercials, corporate, educational, and legacy films.  Over the years, I’ve managed to squeak out a few of my own projects, including Invisible Mountains which won Best Film at DV magazine’s 2003 film festival.  I first started developing my still-image movie technique with 2007’s Fridays at the Farm, which won several awards and was selected for ten traveling film festivals before airing nationally on The Sundance Channel.  Later that year, I created Prayer for Philadelphia, which won the grand prize in a contest held by the Philadelphia Inquirer.  I’ve also I’ve received three Pennsylvania Council on the Arts Fellowships (for screenwriting, documentary, and narrative filmmaking).

In 2009, I co-founded Spring Garden Pictures, which is a non-profit film organization that creates films and supporting educational materials for science museums.  Our first big project is Watermelon Magic, which has been released in seven markets (currently at Harrisburg’s Whitaker Center) and will open in Seattle this spring and at the Smithsonian in D.C. later this year.

You can reach Rich at:

610-246-5133
rich@springgardenpictures.org
www.coyopa.com
www.springgardenpictures.org
www.watermelonmagic.com

And now, the 12 Questions.

1. What kind of kid were you?

I was a bit of a smart aleck as a kid- always trying to make my classmates laugh and getting in trouble for it.  I didn’t mind making myself the butt of a joke if it got someone to smile.  I was and am still curious about most things, and never really understood the phrase “I’m bored”.  I played lots of different sports, was into comic books, and discovered way too late that I am ambi-dexterous (Catholic school casualty…)

2. What influences have shaped you?

When I saw David Lynch’s Wild at Heart as a sophomore in high school, I thought- “what the hell was that?”  I didn’t know you were allowed to make movies that beautiful and twisted.  I always loved watching movies as a kid- Star Wars, Time Bandits, The Dark Crystal, Raiders of the Lost Ark come to mind, but they seemed so otherworldly and beyond my capabilities that I never imagined myself as a maker of films.  Wild at Heart opened a door for me and allowed me to dream of my own space as a creator in this medium.  Prior to that, I had begun to get very interested in art in high school, and thought I might want to be a painter.  As I began to make more films, I realized that filmmaking was a better fit for my abilities.  I continue to be influenced by art, music, and the natural world, perhaps more so than I am by other films.

3. Ever done anything really dumb?

Oh yeah! One time I put my thumb on a cigarette lighter just to see if it worked.  Ouch!   That might have been forgivable in a 5-year old, but I was 18 at the time. My thumb blistered up pretty bad and I had a hard time falling asleep that night.  Another time I stuck a knife in a toaster to get out a stuck piece of bread.  Luckily, my brother unplugged it before I electrocuted myself.

4. How’d you learn to do what you do?

I started out making karate movies with a friend in middle school.  He had a big VHS shoulder-style camera that he borrowed from his aunt (and never gave back), and we would make films with in-camera edits.  We didn’t have a tripod, so his 8-year old sister would often be the DP.  The camera had a cool overdub function, so we would score it with a Casio keyboard and add dialogue after shooting.

As a senior in high school, I took an independent study on filmmaking, since we didn’t have a real course or equipment.  I saved up from my job as a dishwasher at a pizza place to buy a camera of my own, then used two VCR’s to crash edit the way I did in middle school.  By this time, I had applied to a bunch of art programs and NYU film school.  I chose the latter and loved it.  After graduating, I worked at a stock footage house in NYC and watched a lot of time-lapse footage.  I finished up my senior project (shot on 16mm film), and then moved back to the area with my wife.  Since I couldn’t afford film, the arrival of digital video was a great way for me to continue to create at a relatively affordable level.  After making a feature in DVCAM, I missed the clarity and color depth of film, but HD was still out of reach.  I decided to try making a film with a high-resolution digital still camera, and have loved experimenting with time-lapse and various still image techniques ever since.  This ultimately led to my recent completion of an IMAX film (Watermelon Magic) for science museums using over 200,000 stills.  I find that I am continually learning new things and trying to expand my palette of abilities.  Next up- become a better draftsman for storyboarding!

5. What are you working on now?

I have several fulldome/Giant Screen films in development, including a collaboration with Tim Shepherd, an amazing cameraman that specializes in plant time-lapse photography.  We’re also working on more supporting materials for Watermelon Magic, including a children’s book and a hands-on exhibit for museums.  I continue to do client work, and am always grateful when someone thinks my talents are worthy of hire! Here’s a piece we just finished for the Philadelphia Flower Show: http://www.vimeo.com/springgarden/whatisbeauty.

6. Walk us through a typical day at work.

When I’m not out shooting or working in Spring Garden Pictures’ space in Philly, I usually am working from my home office.  I start by making a big pot of black tea, then take twenty minutes or so to plan my day and center myself.  I try to reserve mornings for creative work- writing, editing, drawing, etc.  In the afternoons, I will usually do what I call my producing work- correspondence, meetings, planning, billing, etc.  At some point, I try to sneak an eighteen-minute power nap, which recharges me for the rest of the afternoon and a night with the family.  Sometimes, I have entire days/weeks of producing work, or creative work, but I find that I am usually happier if I can balance my day out with a bit of both.

7. Who do you love?

I love my wife and three kids, my dog, my parents, my brothers and sister, my community of friends, my clients, and of course, my donors!

8. What are you passionate about?

I am passionate about this planet, and hope my work can in some way raise awareness for us all to become better stewards of it.  I am more than a little discouraged by the onslaught of dystopian fantasies of the future that are currently pervasive in the media, and hope to counter that with more positive visions that we can aspire to create.

9. What are you proudest of?

I’m proudest of my family and the love that we share.  As for my projects, it is usually the last thing that I’ve worked on, though occasionally I see a glimmer of something good in my older work.

10. Describe a great night out.

A date with my wife is top on my list, usually dinner and a movie.  I have gotten her interested in good beer, so we like to find places that cater to us beer snobs.  I also love playing poker, darts, and other games with my homies.  I’m a gamer and much more competitive than I’d like to admit, and I’ll play just about anything except lawn darts.  I might hurt myself.

11. So what’s next for you?

One of my joys is that I never quite know what is next.  There are always projects swirling in the ethers that are waiting to be manifested.  Usually, something beyond my control compels me to bring them into form.  Often, this involves funding of some sort.  Sometimes, it is an unending nagging from within that tells me I must make a film, but money definitely helps!

12. What will your epitaph say?

Husband, Father, Friend.  Shine a Light in the Darkness till the end.

Richard Power Hoffman

Know somebody who should be featured on 12 Questions? Tell us!

12 Questions: Sue Redmond

Sue RedmondHi, I’m Sue Redmond.

For 20 years, I’ve produced content in every medium. I’ve made clients happy at all budget levels, in all categories. I have relationships with vendors across the country and the globe. And I understand all the intricacies of the business – from unions to permits to emerging technologies.

  • I am a conductor.
  • I am a hostage negotiator.
  • I am a merrymaker.
  • I am a drill sergeant.
  • I am a magician.
  • I am an accountant.
  • I am a juggler.
  • I am a therapist.
  • I am a travel maestro.
  • I am a conjurer.
  • I am a producer.

I work with Advertising agencies as an agency producer, handle full productions through my company Rubberband or work with other clients directly on their production and short term staffing needs. I work out of my home office in West Chester Pennsylvania but am usually on the road working in a studio, location or edit suite out of town or out of the country. I get calls to produce broadcast campaigns, pull together print shoots or create corporate / pharmaceutical web & meeting content. I love traveling the world, spending my time outdoors especially around water and enjoy live music. When you hire me, there are no gaps in knowledge. And there is no shortage of energy.

You can reach Sue at:

610-496-4042
sredmond@rubberband.tv
www.rubberband.tv

And now, the 12 Questions:

1. What kind of kid were you?

Naughty

2. What influences have shaped you?

Dysfunctional childhood and scandalous living

3. Ever done anything really dumb?

Weekly

4. How’d you learn to do what you do?

Got a jump start in the little black and white TV studio in my high school which gave me 3 years of experience before hitting college …. Still learning today.

5. What are you working on now?

Just finished producing an experiential campaign with Tierney and their client TD Bank called Art for Trees, a TD Forests Project. Ten well known artists with NY ties were commissioned to create an environmental inspired piece of art to be on display in pop-up galleries around NYC, replicated as vinyls and installed in over 115 TD bank stores and auctioned off to support the NYRP / TD Partnership with MillionTreesNYC to help reach their vision of a greener New York City by planting a million trees by 2015. All the original artwork was featured in Pop-up galleries around Manhattan; Grand Central Terminal for a week long installation, on the 14th Street Passage at the High Line for a day and on display at Bette Midler’s Hulaween Party held at the Waldorf Astoria on Halloween night. In addition to all logistics of the campaign, I also produced and directed videos with the artists to be used on a microsite, video loop during all pop-up gallery installations and social media outlets.

6. Walk us through a typical day at work.

I have no routine … my days are defined by the work I am producing and the people I am lucky enough to work with. Ie. Pulling together an estimate in my pajamas or jumping on a plane to shoot on location … all tasks done consistently with a cup of black coffee in hand.

7. Who do you love?

I love my family, my friends and my Starbucks barista.

8. What are you passionate about?

I am passionate about travel, experiencing new cultures, meeting new people, and creating amazing stories and memories along the way.

9. What are you proudest of?

I think I’m proudest of my ability to stay positive through the crazy ride called life. My biggest achievement is raising two great kids and working at a marriage that’s going strong after 30 years.

10. Describe a great night out.

A small intimate dinner party with great friends or a marathon of Orange is the New Black or House of Cards.

11. So what’s next for you?

More travel …..

12. What will your epitaph say?

Sue lived the hell out of life with no regrets!

 

Know somebody who should be featured on 12 Questions? Tell us!

12 Questions: Fred Shamlian

Fred ShamlianHi, I’m Fred Shamlian.

I live and work in Media, PA, a tiny mecca of creativity and America’s first Fair Trade Town. Shamlian Creative is a close-knit team of strategists, designers and storytellers who create beloved brands. Our mission is to engage our client’s customers in ways that make a difference in their lives. As Creative Director, I contribute strategy, concepts, copy and designs. Branding and marketing are core skills, while 25 years of service to credit card issuers has stoked our passion for card design (over 1,000 and counting). Clients include leading banks, a major retailer, real estate developments, professional firms, restaurateurs Michael Wei (Yangming) and Marty Grims (Moshulu); our new invitation design studio, TorahDor; and a pro-bono program in collaboration with Temple Sholom in Broomall to encourage acts of kindness.

You can reach Fred at:

Shamlian Creative
105 West Third St, Media, PA 19063
610-892-0570
fred@open-inc.com
http://shamliancreative.com
http://www.torahdor.com

And now, the 12 Questions.

1. What kind of kid were you?

Chubby, smart, adventurous, loved, happy.

2. What influences have shaped you?

Raising a family…living in a fraternity (PiKA) …Apple…Sensei Tsomu Oshima, who led karate special trainings at Carnegie-Mellon…fellow Love Agent Caldwell Davis, who beamed brightly…the Jersey shore…Chekov…Beethoven…Woody Allen…nature…and being a Fred.

3. Ever done anything really dumb?

Who, me??

4. How’d you learn to do what you do?

I created my first ad at Msgr. Bonner High School, for a Creative Writing Contest. More ads followed for the Carnegie-Mellon Karate Club, sparking 7 weeks of heated discussion in the school paper about sexism…and my first advertising awards.

In his first job after college, my dad became the entire marketing and creative department at Barr’s Jewelers (now Zales). He did it all: strategy, media planning, concepts, copy, design, and production. I learned from him, and I’m grateful for the gift he gave me: a 360º view of client opportunities.

Many other teachers followed. Al Goldman of MARC and Company taught me the poetry of simplicity and the joy of puns. Henry J. Kaufmann – founder of the Washington DC agency HJK&A, my first employer – taught me grace in the face of adversity; Victor Sonder, my CD at SonderLevitt, showed me how to live large. And smart, generous clients at Chase, Barclays, Bank of America and Discover taught me the fine points of data-driven lifecycle marketing.

5. What are you working on now?

  • A campaign for the built-to-order homes at Haverford Reserve
  • Brand identity and site design for a new mobile payment product
  • Credit card designs for Bermuda-based Butterfield Bank and  their partner American Airlines
  • Corporate identity and a new website for Niyonu Spann Associates, organizational transformation specialists

6. Walk us through a typical day at work.

 7:30 am email, project/vendor coordination, strategy (“What questions do we answer today?”)
 8:45 am meditate
 9:00 am creative team briefings, goal-setting, critiques, brainstorming
10:00 am CREATIVE TIME
12:30 pm lunch (usually at my desk, keeping up with new technologies)
 1:30 pm progress reviews and direction
 2:00 pm client communications + proposals, meetings
 4:00 pm CREATIVE TIME
 6:30 pm where did the day go?

7. Who do you love?

Everyone – at least, that’s my goal. Highly aspirational to be sure, but I know that the more beauty I see in people, and the more I can be a force for good in their lives, the richer my life and my world will be. At Shamlian Creative, a compassionate love for the customer has brought a powerful new intelligence into our work. Love asks different questions and illuminates the most meaningful ways to engage and delight. In an age where marketing means engaging, better relationships begin with love.

8. What are you passionate about?

My family and friends, my team, my clients, the future of our country, the need to preserve nature, the status of guys in the world today. I love bold ideas and great product design…theatre and architecture…old cameras and books… exploring great cities like New York, Seattle, Tokyo and London. I love body-surfing, zooming down a winding road on fresh asphalt, cooking on an open fire, chili chocolate, the dumplings at Yangming, my son’s music, my wife’s pottery, and playing ping pong with my son Chase, who really should let me win.

9. What are you proudest of?

#1.  My sons, Forrest and Chase.
#2:  The America West “Surprise & Delight” in-Flight Experience.
#3:  Our interns. For 24 years, we’ve been blessed to work with hundreds of passionate, talented young people from all over the world.

10. Describe a great night out.

A warm night, a full moon, friends, a pristine lake, and a waterfall.

11. So what’s next for you?

The ultimate Love campaign.

12. What will your epitaph say?

Fred loved us very much.

 

Know somebody who should be featured on 12 Questions? Tell us!

12 Questions: Doug Hill

Doug HillMeet Doug Hill.

I’ve been designing, writing and creating ideas and ads for over 30 years. I’ve also been a musician (guitar singer/songwriter for 35 years). I consult for various companies and ad agencies and have several clients of my own; fortunately, this keeps changing and growing and it’s always challenging.

Being a good Dad is my greatest achievement (2 beautiful, independent, strong and amazing girls). Lucky to have partnered with agencies and individuals that won Addy’s, Clio’s, Effie’s, Telly’s and an Andy (you know, the one with the big head). Also, got into the TV & Radio Hall of Fame for a FedEx Super Bowl Spot with writer Ken Cills (Machinery).

I work out of my home office in Wallingford/Swarthmore area and go into Philly and NYC whenever the need arises.

My acoustic duo (92nd Street – myself and Hugh Colocott) is recording our 2nd record, due out this spring. We’ve been performing for 20 years (think Simon & Garfunkel on steroids) — www/myspace.com/92ndstreet.

You can reach Doug at dougyhill@gmail.com and www.doughillcreative.com.

And now, the 12 Questions.

1. What kind of kid were you?

Lucky. #2 of 4 kids, had an older brother that did all the talking, so I learned to get attention by doing; sports, art, magic and then guitar. We were a fishing/hunting family with dogs — so I loved being outside and still have a keen interest in nature, animals and traveling.

2. What influences have shaped you?

My mom was a concert pianist and my dad owned a design studio, so music and art are in my blood. I was a teenager in the 70’s, so I not only fell in love with shows like Lassie, Daktari, Star Trek, Gilligan’s Island and Looney Tunes Cartoons, but was exposed to the greatest diversity of phenomenal music ever:
Beatles/Stones/Jimi Hendrix/Led Zepplin/Elton John/CSN/Cat Stephens/Allman Brothers/Yes/Jethro Tull/Joni Mitchell/Bonnie Raitt/Little Feat/Bob Marley/English Beat/Squeeze/Earth, Wind & Fire/Santana. Also loved the design work of Milton Glaser, the art direction of John Doyle, and the writing of Tolkien, Cormac McCarthy and Michael Creighton.

3. Ever done anything really dumb?

Way too many to mention here. But one classic won’t hurt: Letting my little sister (almost 16 at the time) drive my manual VW Rabbit – her first attempt with a stick shift, she mistook the clutch for the brake and ran into a cedar tree…luckily, only the bumper, hood and my good sense were injured.

4. How’d you learn to do what you do?

You get inspired, try something, fail, try again, eventually succeed and then repeat.

5. What are you working on now?

Some outdoor for the University of Delaware, some marketing for Mercer Bucks Cardiology and partnering with Allied Pixel on a digital campaign. Playing my guitar, singing and riding my CAAD 10 are always a work in progress.

6. Walk us through a typical day at work.

Read some news, answer a few emails, desperately search for some lame stock imagery, design or write, depending on the assignment and then revise until it seems like there’s something worth sharing (which sometimes, can take much longer than expected).

7. Who do you love?

Page and Logan (my 2 girls), Nicki, my girlfriend and my best friends; my Dad, Bob, Hugh, Kevin & Connie, Moshe, Fred and me.

8. What are you passionate about?

My kids, my work, my music, riding my bike, spending time with Nicki, catching trout, throwing the Frisbee, and reading and talking about the issues that are dividing our country. Oh yeah, drinking quality red wine, too.

9. What are you proudest of?

Giving my daughters Page and Logan the love and inspiration they deserve to find something to be passionate about.

10. Describe a great night out.

Going to a favorite BYOB (Birchrunville Café comes to mind), ordering Duck, sharing a bottle of Red Cabernet, and then listening to a great singer/songwriter while my mind drifts off into another realm.

11. So what’s next for you?

Listening, collaborating and learning with more creative experts and brands to offer even smarter solutions to their competitive landscapes. In other words, get better.

12. What will your epitaph say?

(Hopefully) Here lies Doug, who enjoyed life to the fullest and never stopped trying new things.

 

Know somebody who should be featured on 12 Questions? Tell us!

12 Questions: Mark Lipsky

Mark LipskyMeet Mark Lipsky.

Mark is the President & CEO of The Radio Agency, the national advertising agency 100% focused on results from radio.  He’s the author of “Radio Tips: 101 Tips, Tricks and Secrets to Make Your Radio Advertising More Profitable” and a frequent convention and conference speaker.  He lives in Broomall and survives the grueling 6-10 minute commute from his home to The Radio Agency’s offices in Media.  You can reach Mark at (610) 892-7300 x108 or via email at Mark@TheRadioAgency.com.

And now, the 12 Questions.

1. What kind of kid were you?

I was obsessed with music.  The Beatles invaded America when I was seven.  I spent the next 10 years surgically connected to a radio, bopping to the British Invasion and grooving to Motown and Memphis.  I was that cartoon-caricature kid who twisted radio dials under the blankets at 3 AM, entranced by the faraway stations that entered my bedroom via sky waves.  I was also a bit of a wiseass that did way too many impersonations for a 10-year old.

2. What influences have shaped you?

My sister taught me how to read while I was still in a playpen.  My working-class parents scraped together the funds to put me through college.  Saturday Night Live banged my funny bone and saved me from a life in chartered accountancy.  My mentors and colleagues at WPEN/WMGK helped me develop my writing and marketing skills.  A Lakota medicine man and a biofeedback institute trained me to simplify my life by not working so hard to complicate it.  I’ve been remarkably fortunate to benefit from the love and good influences of so many.

3. Ever done anything really dumb?

Pretty much every day.  But last summer was a doozy.  My daughter and I were driving to Quebec for a week-long vacation.  Five hours into the trip, just north of Albany, I realized I’d left our passports at home.  We could enter Canada, but we wouldn’t be able to get back home.  We drove five hours back to Philly, with me kicking myself over my stupidity.  My daughter and I broke the mood and salvaged the ride by creating an improv game naming – and then acting out – the “even more stupid” things I could have done.  (We cashed in frequent flyer miles the next day to join our vacation, already in progress.)

4. How’d you learn to do what you do?

By listening hard and then putting myself in a position to be surrounded by some wonderfully-talented people I could emulate.  Through diligence and pure passion, I logged my 10,000 hours.  And then the fun started.

5. What are you working on now?

I’m writing a fascinating piece called “12 Questions Interview.”  In about an hour, I’ll be back at work on several advertising campaigns while deftly avoiding work on my half-finished second book.

6. Walk us through a typical day at work.

Client meetings.  Staff meetings.  Scripting a radio commercial or two.  Directing voice talent in a recording session.  A couple of phone calls with total strangers, explaining to one why radio is not a good fit for them and explaining to the other why radio is their perfect match.  Always a curve ball.  Rarely a dull moment.

7. Who do you love?

My amazing daughter, Kirsten.  For better or worse, she’s assimilated my sense of humor and is gifted at improv and creative writing.  She also has a beautiful singing voice.  She’s centered my world and balanced my life, all by being simply wonderful and playfully silly.

8. What are you passionate about?

Radio.  Jazz.  Improv.  Howard Stern.  Arrested Development.  Elliptical Workouts.  Blues.  Travel.  Philly Sports.  Sambuca rocks shaken.  SNL.  And the satisfaction of helping others realize their potential by making positive choices as an active driver on the road of life.  Beep beep, beep beep, yeah.

9. What are you proudest of?

Over the past 20 years, I’ve had the good fortune to lead an incredible team of creative professionals at The Radio Agency.  They make me proud to meet captains of industry and tell them our story.

10. Describe a great night out.

First, call ahead to request good weather.  Next, a light-but-satisfying meal; possibly sushi.  Then some entertainment: jazz, blues, improv, maybe a little Zydeco dancing.  Finally, a cool-evening-breeze walk with rich visuals for the eyes and a warm hand-in-hand to share the stride.

11. So what’s next for you?

Whatever comes my way.  I’m a planner, but happily balanced by the reality that out of seven billion people on this planet, I only get to control one of them.  (And that’s on a good day.)  So no matter what I think will come next, what comes next will be what comes next.  Life’s an endless buffet of planned positivity dashed with surprise and unexpected tragedy.  Master the mix and each day becomes a navigable adventure, well worth the daily dive.

12. What will your epitaph say?

“Ouch.  Don’t step there.”

 

Know somebody who should be featured on 12 Questions? Tell us!

Twelve Questions: Zave Smith

Zave SmithExuberant and poignant, philosophical and passionate, Zave Smith’s photographs capture the tangible pleasures and tactile experiences of life in close-up.  Raised and trained in the Midwest, now working out of Philadelphia and New York, Zave has a special feeling for personality that suffuses his work. See it at www.zavesmith.com

1. What kind of kid were you?

A bit of a nerd.

2. What influences have shaped you?

What drive me are my dad’s love of humanity and my mother’s drive. Several of my earliest memories include: The Diego Rivera Mural at the Detroit Institute of Art.  The song, “Susan” by Leonard Cohen.  A film about taking a train to Jerusalem and Robert Frank’s “The Americans”. Continue reading →

Twelve Questions: Frank Margasak

Frank Margasak

Frank, in his own words:

I have had a lengthy and diverse career, in historical order first in Philadelphia, then twenty years in Chicago as a fashion illustrator. Like many of my colleagues, had careers ended or severely reduced by the camera, it happened almost over night. I was lucky enough to migrate into storyboards , and licensing art in Minneapolis and back in Philadelphia ten years ago. I continue to work in the previously mentioned illustrative disciplines, and I am strongly involved with doing children’s book art as well.  I now live in Chester County, I still get enormous joy out of drawing, I won several awards, I never thought they were as valuable as support by my fellow colleagues. Spending time with my grandchildren is my greatest joy, and finding a life long mate is still one of my dreams. In addition to the above I am fully engaged as a Fashion Bridal Portrait Artist as well. Continue reading →

Twelve Questions: Bill Haley

Bill HaleyWith more than 2,000 commercial credits to his name over the past 20 years, Bill Haley is one of the region’s most prolific media makers. He  is an award-winning producer/director and principal of Allied Pixel, a digital media production firm that connects the dots between video and interactive. He’s also one of the founders of PhillyCreativeGuide.com. Bill lives in Chadds Ford with his wife Rebecca, two kids and numerous pets. Contact him at bill.haley@alliedpixel.com.

1. What kind of kid were you?

Shy. I was the kid at the birthday party who was standing in the corner, wondering when I could go home. I spent a lot of time riding around on my bike, thinking about things. Continue reading →

“Joe’s Junk Yard” – Photo book by Lisa Kereszi

Joe's Junk YardPhilly-raised photographer Lisa Kereszi’s new book, “Joe’s Junk Yard,” is “a personal narrative photo book, spanning more than fifty years and three generations, that explores one family’s achievement and subsequent demise of the American Dream.”

Read more about it at http://lisakereszi.com/publications/joes-junk-yard.

Kereszi is on the faculty of the Yale School of Art, and Acting Director of Undergraduate Studies in Photography. She has also taught at the International Center of Photography and School of Visual Arts and has been a visiting artist/critic at the Yale School of Architecture, NYU, Massachusetts College of Art, Parsons, School of Visual Arts, Vassar, UNC Chapel Hill, Eastern Tenn. State and for George Madison University. She has traveled to Central Asia to teach a group of artists through an exchange program through CEC Arts Link, and was an artist-in-residence at a program at Atlantic Center for the Arts in Summer 2005, at Lake Balaton in Hungary in 2006, and at Chashama North in 2007.   Her work is in many private collections and in that of the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Altoids Curiously Strong Collection of the New Museum of Contemporary Art, the Brooklyn Museum of Art, the Ogden Museum of Southern Art, the Berkeley Art Museum and the Yale University Art Gallery. Find out more about her at http://lisakereszi.com/.

 

Interview: Patrick Fyock, Online Media Analyst

Patrick Fyock

Patrick Fyock is an online media analyst at Harmelin Media. In this PhIMA interview, find out the first place he goes for information in the morning, the next big step for digital media, and how he feels about working in Philly.

Read the interview at http://phillyinteractive.org/top-phive.

Thanks to our friends at PhIMA, the Philadelphia Interactive Marketing Association, for this interview. Find out more about PhIMA at http://phillyinteractive.org/about.